CDing_160516_006.JPG
 Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China’s fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. Based on official statistics, net annual income of the fishermen increased 140 times from 1978 to 2013, resulting in fishing becoming a significantly more lucrative trade than farming. This income difference is one of the reasons that workers from China’s inland provinces are attracted to the fishing industry.

Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China’s fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. Based on official statistics, net annual income of the fishermen increased 140 times from 1978 to 2013, resulting in fishing becoming a significantly more lucrative trade than farming. This income difference is one of the reasons that workers from China’s inland provinces are attracted to the fishing industry.

CDing_160516_021.JPG
CDing_160516_065.JPG
CDing_140516_007.JPG
CDing_160516_019.JPG
 In Ya Tou Zhen, we visit a private oyster farm. In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. In Ya Tou Zhen, the substrate is old clam shells.

In Ya Tou Zhen, we visit a private oyster farm. In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. In Ya Tou Zhen, the substrate is old clam shells.

CDing_170516_052.JPG
CDing_160516_031.JPG
CDing_160516_045.JPG
CDing_160516_068.JPG
CDing_170516_051.JPG
CDing_140516_035.JPG
CDing_170516_062.JPG
CDing_170516_103.JPG
CDing_170516_123.JPG
CDing_160516_006.JPG
 Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China’s fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. Based on official statistics, net annual income of the fishermen increased 140 times from 1978 to 2013, resulting in fishing becoming a significantly more lucrative trade than farming. This income difference is one of the reasons that workers from China’s inland provinces are attracted to the fishing industry.
CDing_160516_021.JPG
CDing_160516_065.JPG
CDing_140516_007.JPG
CDing_160516_019.JPG
 In Ya Tou Zhen, we visit a private oyster farm. In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. In Ya Tou Zhen, the substrate is old clam shells.
CDing_170516_052.JPG
CDing_160516_031.JPG
CDing_160516_045.JPG
CDing_160516_068.JPG
CDing_170516_051.JPG
CDing_140516_035.JPG
CDing_170516_062.JPG
CDing_170516_103.JPG
CDing_170516_123.JPG

Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China’s fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. Based on official statistics, net annual income of the fishermen increased 140 times from 1978 to 2013, resulting in fishing becoming a significantly more lucrative trade than farming. This income difference is one of the reasons that workers from China’s inland provinces are attracted to the fishing industry.

In Ya Tou Zhen, we visit a private oyster farm. In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. In Ya Tou Zhen, the substrate is old clam shells.

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