In 2010, China accounted for 60% of global aquaculture production (by volume) and had ~14 million people engaged as fishers and fish-farmers. Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

In 2010, China accounted for 60% of global aquaculture production (by volume) and had ~14 million people engaged as fishers and fish-farmers. Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

 Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

 Because the fish and shellfish have been lifted straight from the sea, the sellers hardly have time to organise them before selling.

Because the fish and shellfish have been lifted straight from the sea, the sellers hardly have time to organise them before selling.

 A small catch of fugu (河豚 in Chinese) otherwise known as pufferfish, and more commonly associated with Japan. Fugu is infamous for its poison - located mainly in the organs and blood - and is considered a delicacy. 

A small catch of fugu (河豚 in Chinese) otherwise known as pufferfish, and more commonly associated with Japan. Fugu is infamous for its poison - located mainly in the organs and blood - and is considered a delicacy. 

 May, the season for langoustines. Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China's fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. 

May, the season for langoustines. Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China's fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. 

 Ya Tou Zhen ('the end of the cliff' town) is a town in Rongcheng city, also in Shandong province. This fisherman steers a net full of newly harvested oysters out of the water. 

Ya Tou Zhen ('the end of the cliff' town) is a town in Rongcheng city, also in Shandong province. This fisherman steers a net full of newly harvested oysters out of the water. 

 In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. At 'Ya Tou Zhen', that substrate is old clam shells. A fisherman cuts the old clam shells free in preparation for threading onto rope. 

In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. At 'Ya Tou Zhen', that substrate is old clam shells. A fisherman cuts the old clam shells free in preparation for threading onto rope. 

 Women work in a makeshift pavilion where they thread clam shells onto pieces of rope. Around 400,000 people - many young women - are estimated to work in China's fish-processing sector and many of them are concentrated in the Shandong area. 

Women work in a makeshift pavilion where they thread clam shells onto pieces of rope. Around 400,000 people - many young women - are estimated to work in China's fish-processing sector and many of them are concentrated in the Shandong area. 

 Rope is gripped by two pieces of wood that have been cut to its shape. Each of the clam shells has many holes through which the rope can be threaded. 

Rope is gripped by two pieces of wood that have been cut to its shape. Each of the clam shells has many holes through which the rope can be threaded. 

 Oyster farms are tended by fishermen in the afternoon, about 500m away from the dock. 

Oyster farms are tended by fishermen in the afternoon, about 500m away from the dock. 

 Rongcheng is the eastern-most point of Shandong peninsula, and the closest part of China to Korea, flanked by the Yellow Sea on all sides except the West. 

Rongcheng is the eastern-most point of Shandong peninsula, and the closest part of China to Korea, flanked by the Yellow Sea on all sides except the West. 

 Fisherman tending oysters under a cloudless sky. 

Fisherman tending oysters under a cloudless sky. 

 Fisherman's wife separates oysters with a hammer at their private, local restaurant. 

Fisherman's wife separates oysters with a hammer at their private, local restaurant. 

 Situated in Li Jia Cun (literally 'Li family village'), the restaurant is opened up for distinguished guests, friends, and family only, including this local factory owner. 

Situated in Li Jia Cun (literally 'Li family village'), the restaurant is opened up for distinguished guests, friends, and family only, including this local factory owner. 

Fugu for breakfast
Fugu for breakfast

At around 9am, after the day's fishing is done, the fugu is cooked for the guests and ready to eat, along with generous quantities of rice wine. 

 In 2010, China accounted for 60% of global aquaculture production (by volume) and had ~14 million people engaged as fishers and fish-farmers. Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 
 Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 
 Because the fish and shellfish have been lifted straight from the sea, the sellers hardly have time to organise them before selling.
 A small catch of fugu (河豚 in Chinese) otherwise known as pufferfish, and more commonly associated with Japan. Fugu is infamous for its poison - located mainly in the organs and blood - and is considered a delicacy. 
 May, the season for langoustines. Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China's fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. 
 Ya Tou Zhen ('the end of the cliff' town) is a town in Rongcheng city, also in Shandong province. This fisherman steers a net full of newly harvested oysters out of the water. 
 In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. At 'Ya Tou Zhen', that substrate is old clam shells. A fisherman cuts the old clam shells free in preparation for threading onto rope. 
 Women work in a makeshift pavilion where they thread clam shells onto pieces of rope. Around 400,000 people - many young women - are estimated to work in China's fish-processing sector and many of them are concentrated in the Shandong area. 
 Rope is gripped by two pieces of wood that have been cut to its shape. Each of the clam shells has many holes through which the rope can be threaded. 
 Oyster farms are tended by fishermen in the afternoon, about 500m away from the dock. 
 Rongcheng is the eastern-most point of Shandong peninsula, and the closest part of China to Korea, flanked by the Yellow Sea on all sides except the West. 
 Fisherman tending oysters under a cloudless sky. 
 Fisherman's wife separates oysters with a hammer at their private, local restaurant. 
 Situated in Li Jia Cun (literally 'Li family village'), the restaurant is opened up for distinguished guests, friends, and family only, including this local factory owner. 
Fugu for breakfast

In 2010, China accounted for 60% of global aquaculture production (by volume) and had ~14 million people engaged as fishers and fish-farmers. Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

Every morning there is a fish market at Ma tou ('port head') in Weihai in East China. The fishermen go out on their boats in the middle of the night around 3am, and come back in time for the market at breakfast. Orderly rows of buoys, each trailing long ropes with oysters growing underwater. 

Because the fish and shellfish have been lifted straight from the sea, the sellers hardly have time to organise them before selling.

A small catch of fugu (河豚 in Chinese) otherwise known as pufferfish, and more commonly associated with Japan. Fugu is infamous for its poison - located mainly in the organs and blood - and is considered a delicacy. 

May, the season for langoustines. Over the past three decades, the number of people who work in China's fishing industry has increased by more than 10 million. 

Ya Tou Zhen ('the end of the cliff' town) is a town in Rongcheng city, also in Shandong province. This fisherman steers a net full of newly harvested oysters out of the water. 

In one method of cultivating oysters, a substrate is required onto which the oyster can attach as a 'spat' and subsequently grow. At 'Ya Tou Zhen', that substrate is old clam shells. A fisherman cuts the old clam shells free in preparation for threading onto rope. 

Women work in a makeshift pavilion where they thread clam shells onto pieces of rope. Around 400,000 people - many young women - are estimated to work in China's fish-processing sector and many of them are concentrated in the Shandong area. 

Rope is gripped by two pieces of wood that have been cut to its shape. Each of the clam shells has many holes through which the rope can be threaded. 

Oyster farms are tended by fishermen in the afternoon, about 500m away from the dock. 

Rongcheng is the eastern-most point of Shandong peninsula, and the closest part of China to Korea, flanked by the Yellow Sea on all sides except the West. 

Fisherman tending oysters under a cloudless sky. 

Fisherman's wife separates oysters with a hammer at their private, local restaurant. 

Situated in Li Jia Cun (literally 'Li family village'), the restaurant is opened up for distinguished guests, friends, and family only, including this local factory owner. 

Fugu for breakfast

At around 9am, after the day's fishing is done, the fugu is cooked for the guests and ready to eat, along with generous quantities of rice wine. 

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